Peel Four

Maker and role
Artist: Marjorie Strider, American, 1931-2014
Year
1977

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Details


Media/materials
Painted aluminum
Measurements
12 x 11 x 20in (30.5 x 27.9 x 50.8cm)
Credit line
Gift of Robert L. B. Tobin
Accession number
1985.3
Object type
Department
Location
Further information
Exhibiting alongside Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein, Marjorie Strider was one of many Pop artists who rose to prominence in the 1960s. Like her contemporaries, Strider is known for her representations of everyday objects, including fruit, vegetables, and flowers, that push the boundaries between painting and sculpture. Here, Strider carefully represents the immediately recognizable orange peel, typically discarded without a thought, in three dimensional form. Although static, the work imbues its subject with the look of graceful movement. Cast in aluminum, the sculpture appears soft and malleable, jauntily uncoiling toward the viewer.
Subject period

 Comments


Sometimes the installation of a particular object will depend on the exhibition--in this case, the sculpture was installed higher than eye level to give the viewer an unexpected moment as they walk through the gallery. Instead of viewing the sculpture head-on, a visitor gets the chance to see it from a different perspective! You’ll see similar “moments” like this in various collection and exhibition galleries in the museum. Thank you for visiting, and thank you very much for your comment on the website—we really like to see this type of interaction with our collection.

- Admin

Posted on 18-10-2019 16:42:10

I’m curious if anyone can answer this question about the display of this piece: Why is the Peel sculpture hung 8 or 9 feet up in the air? Its sister painting is sitting right there at eye level while this one is up there & you can only see part of the sculpture’s details. And some patrons might walk by & miss it completely. Was it the late artist’s vision to display it up there? Love your museum.

- MD

Posted on 02-10-2019 11:17:34